Acetone

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  • BVV™ Acetone 99% Shop Brands BVV

    BVV™ High Purity Acetone 99%

    BVV™ High Purity Acetone 99%  HAZMAT ITEMS ARE NON-REFUNDABLE. ALL SALES ARE FINAL (Note: Container style and color may vary) Explore our top-quality Acetone, a versatile solvent that meets the highest standards of quality and purity. Our Acetone is ideal for a wide range of applications, whether you're in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic or industrial sector. With its exceptional solvent properties, Acetone serves as a reliable solution for cleaning, degreasing, and dissolving various substances. Our Acetone is carefully sourced to ensure consistency and effectiveness, making it a popular choice for professionals and businesses alike. Our Acetone is subjected to stringent quality control measures, ensuring exceptional purity that's perfect for various processes, from extraction to cleaning and stripping applications. Discover the exceptional performance and dependability of our Acetone, specially created to surpass your rigorous requirements. Unleash the potential of this top-notch solvent, and enhance the efficiency and efficacy of your processes to a whole new level. Opt for our Acetone for unparalleled outcomes and make the most of its adaptability in a variety of crucial tasks. BVV™ Acetone 99% - SDS BVV Acetone 99% - COA What is Acetone? Acetone is a clear, colorless, and highly flammable liquid with a distinctive sweet, fruity odor. It is a simple organic compound with the chemical formula C3H6O, belonging to the ketone family. Acetone is widely used as a solvent in various industries due to its excellent solubility and fast evaporation rate. In addition to its solvent properties, acetone has many other applications. It is commonly used as a cleaning agent, degreaser, and paint thinner. It is also a key ingredient in nail polish removers and some cosmetic products. Acetone is utilized in the production of plastics, fibers, resins, and various chemicals. Additionally, it serves as a fuel additive and is used for scientific and laboratory purposes. As a highly versatile and effective solvent, acetone plays a vital role in numerous industrial, commercial, and domestic applications, making it an essential component in various processes. What Are The Properties of Acetone? Acetone is a colorless, volatile, and highly flammable liquid with several notable properties: Physical State: Acetone is a liquid at room temperature and pressure, with a boiling point of 132.8F/56C and a melting point of -94.9°C (-138.8°F). Odor: It has a distinct and characteristic odor that is often described as sweet or fruity. Solubility: Acetone is highly soluble in water, alcohols, ethers, and many other organic solvents. This high solubility contributes to its effectiveness as a cleaning agent and solvent. Density: The density of acetone is about 0.79 g/cm³, making it less dense than water. Vapor Pressure: Acetone has a relatively high vapor pressure, which means that it readily evaporates into the air at room temperature. Flammability: Acetone is highly flammable and has a low flash point of -20.8°C (-5.4°F). This means that it can easily ignite when exposed to an open flame, spark, or other sources of ignition. Reactivity: Acetone is a reactive compound and can participate in various chemical reactions. It can react with strong acids, bases, and oxidizing agents. Acidity: Acetone is a weak acid, and its aqueous solutions can exhibit slightly acidic properties. Miscibility: Acetone is miscible with water and many organic solvents. This property makes it suitable for various applications in different industries. Polarity: Acetone is a polar solvent, meaning that it has a partial positive and partial negative charge distribution within its molecule. This polarity allows it to dissolve a wide range of polar and nonpolar compounds. Boiling Point: Acetone has a relatively low boiling point 132.8F/56C, which makes it easy to evaporate and separate from other substances during distillation processes. Evaporation Rate: Acetone has a fast evaporation rate, which makes it suitable for applications where rapid drying is necessary. It's important to note that acetone's properties contribute to its versatility and wide range of applications in various industries, including cleaning, manufacturing, laboratory work, cosmetics, and more. However, due to its flammability and reactivity, proper safety precautions should always be followed when working with acetone. What Is The Structure Of Acetone? The chemical structure of acetone consists of three atoms: one carbon (C) atom, one oxygen (O) atom, and three hydrogen (H) atoms. It is a simple organic compound with the molecular formula C3H6O. The structural formula of acetone can be represented as: In this structural representation: The central carbon (C) atom is bonded to two hydrogen (H) atoms and one oxygen (O) atom. The oxygen atom is double-bonded to the central carbon atom, forming a carbonyl group (C=O). The remaining valences of the carbon atom are filled by single bonds to the two hydrogen atoms. This arrangement of atoms gives acetone its distinctive chemical properties, including its solubility in water, high vapor pressure, and reactivity as a solvent and chemical reagent. How Is Acetone Produced? Acetone is produced through various industrial processes, with the most common method being the catalytic dehydrogenation of isopropanol. Here's an overview of the primary process used to produce acetone: 1. Dehydrogenation of Isopropanol: The most widely used method to produce acetone is the dehydrogenation of isopropanol, also known as the "cumene process." This process involves several steps: a. Production of Cumene: Cumene (isopropylbenzene) is produced from benzene and propylene in the presence of a catalyst such as aluminum chloride. This results in the formation of cumene and hydrogen chloride as byproducts. b. Oxidation of Cumene to Cumene Hydroperoxide: Cumene is then oxidized using air to form cumene hydroperoxide, typically using a catalytic process with acid or base catalysts. c. Cleavage of Cumene Hydroperoxide: Cumene hydroperoxide is cleaved using acid catalysts to yield phenol and acetone. This reaction results in the simultaneous production of phenol, which is used as a valuable chemical in various industries. d. Distillation and Separation: The mixture of phenol and acetone is then separated using distillation techniques. Acetone is obtained as a separate product from the mixture. 2. Other Processes: Apart from the cumene process, there are alternative methods for acetone production, including: a. Propylene Oxidation: Acetone can be produced through the direct oxidation of propylene using air or oxygen as the oxidizing agent. This method yields propylene oxide and acetone as products. b. Acetaldehyde Condensation: In this method, acetaldehyde is condensed and dehydrated to form acetone. This process is less common compared to the cumene process. c. Bio-based Production: Research is ongoing to develop bio-based methods of acetone production, using renewable resources like biomass or microorganisms that can convert sugars into acetone. d. Repurposing Byproducts: Acetone can also be obtained as a byproduct in various industrial processes, such as the production of phenol, where acetone is produced alongside phenol from cumene hydroperoxide. The cumene process remains the most dominant and economical method for producing acetone on an industrial scale. The choice of production method depends on factors such as availability of feedstocks, economics, environmental considerations, and desired product yields. Is Acetone Safe? Acetone is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) when used in appropriate amounts and under proper conditions. However, like any chemical substance, it should be handled with care and used according to safety guidelines. Here are some important points to consider regarding the safety of acetone: Ventilation: Acetone has a strong odor and can release fumes that may be irritating to the eyes, nose, and throat. When using acetone, make sure you are in a well-ventilated area to minimize inhalation of the fumes. Skin Contact: Acetone can be drying to the skin and may cause irritation, especially with prolonged or frequent exposure. It's advisable to wear gloves when handling acetone to protect your skin. Eye Contact: Avoid getting acetone in your eyes, as it can cause irritation and discomfort. If accidental eye contact occurs, rinse your eyes thoroughly with water and seek medical attention if irritation persists. Ingestion: Acetone is not intended for ingestion and should not be consumed. Ingesting acetone can be harmful and may lead to adverse health effects. Flammability: Acetone is highly flammable and should be kept away from open flames, sparks, and heat sources. Store acetone in a cool, dry place and away from direct sunlight. Sensitive Individuals: Some individuals may be more sensitive to the effects of acetone, experiencing skin irritation, allergic reactions, or respiratory discomfort. If you have a history of sensitivities or allergies, exercise caution when using acetone. Use as Directed: When using acetone for specific applications such as nail polish removal, adhesive removal, or cleaning, follow the recommended instructions on the product label or recipe. Avoid excessive or prolonged exposure. Alternative Options: If you are concerned about the potential risks of using acetone, you can consider using alternative products that are specifically formulated for the task at hand. For example, there are acetone-free nail polish removers available that may be gentler on the nails and cuticles. If you have specific health concerns or are unsure about the safety of using acetone, it's always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional or seek advice from experts in the field. Additionally, reading and following safety information provided on product labels and material safety data sheets (MSDS) is crucial to ensure safe handling and use of acetone and other chemicals. What are the hazards of Acetone? Acetone is a commonly used chemical solvent, but like any chemical substance, it poses certain hazards that need to be considered when handling and using it. Some of the hazards associated with acetone include: Flammability: Acetone is highly flammable and can catch fire easily. Its low flash point makes it volatile and prone to ignition when exposed to open flames, sparks, or heat sources. It's important to store and use acetone away from potential sources of ignition. Inhalation Hazards: Acetone can release strong vapors that are irritating to the respiratory system. Prolonged or repeated inhalation of these vapors can lead to headaches, dizziness, nausea, and respiratory discomfort. Adequate ventilation is essential when using acetone to minimize exposure to its fumes. Skin and Eye Irritation: Acetone can be drying to the skin and may cause irritation or redness upon direct contact. It can also irritate the eyes and lead to discomfort if splashed or accidentally introduced into the eyes. Central Nervous System Effects: Acetone vapor exposure can affect the central nervous system, leading to symptoms like dizziness, confusion, and even unconsciousness at high concentrations. Toxic Effects: While acetone is generally considered to have low toxicity, exposure to large amounts or prolonged exposure can have toxic effects on the body. Ingesting acetone can lead to nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and even coma in severe cases. Health Risks: Long-term or chronic exposure to acetone can potentially have adverse health effects, including damage to the liver, kidneys, and respiratory system. Repeated skin contact can cause dryness and irritation. Environmental Impact: Improper disposal of acetone can lead to environmental contamination. Acetone is volatile and can easily evaporate into the air, contributing to air pollution. It can also be harmful to aquatic life if introduced into water bodies. Allergic Reactions: Some individuals may be sensitive or allergic to acetone, experiencing skin reactions or respiratory discomfort even at lower concentrations. It's important to take appropriate safety precautions when using acetone, including wearing protective gear such as gloves and safety goggles, working in a well-ventilated area, and avoiding open flames or heat sources. If working with acetone in an industrial or laboratory setting, it's crucial to follow established safety protocols and guidelines, as well as refer to the material safety data sheet (MSDS) provided by the manufacturer. Overall, while acetone is a valuable solvent with various applications, it should be handled with care and respect for its potential hazards. If you have any concerns or questions about the safe use of acetone, it's recommended to consult with experts in the field or seek guidance from health and safety professionals. How Flammable Is Acetone? Acetone is highly flammable and poses a significant fire and explosion hazard. It has a low flash point of -20.8°C (-5.4°F), which means that it can easily vaporize and form flammable mixtures with air at temperatures above its flash point. Acetone's wide flammability range (2.5% to 12.8% in air) indicates that even small concentrations of acetone vapor in the air can be ignited by a spark, open flame, or other sources of ignition. Due to its low flash point and flammable nature, acetone should be handled with extreme caution and stored away from sources of heat, sparks, and flames. When using acetone, it's important to follow proper safety practices, such as working in well-ventilated areas, using appropriate protective equipment, and avoiding activities that can generate sparks or heat. Acetone's high flammability also makes it necessary to take precautions when storing and transporting the solvent. Flammable liquids like acetone should be stored in approved containers and away from incompatible materials, such as oxidizing agents, to prevent potential chemical reactions and fires. It's essential to be aware of acetone's flammability and take all necessary safety measures to minimize the risk of fire and ensure a safe working environment when handling this solvent. How Is Acetone Used? Acetone is a versatile organic compound with a wide range of industrial, commercial, and household applications due to its excellent solvent properties and low toxicity. Here are some common uses of acetone: Solvent: Acetone is primarily known for its effectiveness as a solvent. It dissolves a variety of substances, making it useful for cleaning, degreasing, and removing residues from surfaces, equipment, and materials. It is commonly used in industrial settings to clean machinery and equipment. Nail Polish Remover: Acetone is a key ingredient in many nail polish removers. It effectively dissolves nail polish and helps remove it from the nails. Paint and Coating Removal: Acetone is used to remove paint, varnishes, lacquers, and other coatings from surfaces like wood, metal, and plastic. It's particularly useful for removing paint spills or overspray. Adhesive Remover: Acetone can be used to soften and remove adhesives, glues, and tapes from surfaces without causing damage. Chemical Intermediate: Acetone is used as an intermediate in the production of other chemicals. It's a precursor in the manufacturing of products like methyl methacrylate, bisphenol A (used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins), and isopropyl alcohol. Laboratory Reagent: Acetone is used in laboratories as a reagent in various chemical reactions and as a solvent for analytical techniques like chromatography. Thinner for Paints and Inks: Acetone is used as a thinning agent for paints, inks, and varnishes to adjust their viscosity and improve their application. Cosmetics and Personal Care Products: Apart from nail polish remover, acetone is used in the production of cosmetics, skincare products, and perfumes. Medical and Pharmaceutical Uses: Acetone is used in some medical and pharmaceutical applications, such as cleaning medical equipment and removing residues from glassware in laboratories. Cleaning Agent: Acetone is effective at removing greasy or sticky residues from various surfaces. It's often used for cleaning electronics, removing ink stains, and cleaning glass surfaces. Fuel Additive: In some instances, acetone is used as an additive in fuel to improve its combustion efficiency, although this application is less common. Aerosol Propellant: Acetone's ability to vaporize quickly makes it useful as a propellant in aerosol products like air fresheners, deodorants, and cleaning sprays. It's important to note that while acetone is versatile and widely used, it should be handled with care due to its flammable nature. Proper ventilation and safety precautions should be taken when using acetone in any application. How Is Acetone Used In Extraction? Acetone is occasionally used in extraction processes, particularly in the field of chemistry and research, where it serves as a solvent to extract certain compounds from various materials. However, it's important to note that acetone has limitations and risks when used for extraction, and its use should be approached cautiously and with proper safety measures. Here's how acetone can be used in extraction processes: Extraction of Essential Oils and Fragrances: Acetone can be used to extract essential oils and fragrances from plant materials. The solvent's low boiling point allows it to evaporate quickly, leaving behind the extracted aromatic compounds. Extraction of Active Compounds: Acetone can be used to extract active compounds from natural sources, such as medicinal plants or herbs. The solvent's polarity can help dissolve and extract specific compounds like alkaloids, flavonoids, and phenolic compounds. Extraction of Lipids and Fats: Acetone is sometimes used to extract lipids and fats from materials like seeds, nuts, or plant tissues. Its ability to dissolve fats and oils makes it suitable for this purpose. Research and Analysis: In laboratories, acetone is sometimes used as a solvent to prepare samples for analysis by techniques like chromatography or spectroscopy. It can help solubilize compounds of interest for further investigation. Cleaning and Preparing Samples: Acetone can be used to clean surfaces and equipment in preparation for various chemical processes, ensuring that surfaces are free from contaminants that could affect the extraction. Recrystallization: Acetone can also be used for recrystallization processes in the lab, where impure solid compounds are dissolved in acetone and then allowed to crystallize out in a more purified form. It's important to exercise caution when using acetone in extraction processes: Flammability: Acetone is highly flammable and should never be used near open flames or in poorly ventilated areas. Toxicity: Acetone can be harmful if inhaled, ingested, or absorbed through the skin. Proper personal protective equipment (PPE) should be worn, and work should be conducted in a well-ventilated area. Chemical Compatibility: Acetone may not be suitable for extracting all types of compounds, as it can degrade certain materials and might not effectively extract specific compounds. Due to these risks and limitations, alternative solvents or extraction methods are often preferred in various extraction processes. When considering using acetone in an extraction, it's crucial to assess the specific requirements of the extraction and ensure that proper safety measures are in place. What Gaskets Are Compatible With Acetone? Acetone is a powerful solvent that can degrade certain materials, including both silicone and Nitrile/BUNA-N gaskets. When choosing gaskets for use with acetone, it's essential to select materials that are resistant to the solvent's effects to ensure safe and effective sealing. The following gasket materials are generally considered compatible with acetone: PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene): PTFE gaskets, also known as Teflon gaskets, are highly resistant to acetone and a wide range of other chemicals. They have excellent chemical stability and can withstand the corrosive nature of acetone. Viton (Fluoroelastomer): Viton gaskets are resistant to a variety of chemicals, including acetone. They are often used in applications where high-temperature and chemical resistance are required. EPDM (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer): EPDM gaskets are compatible with acetone for short exposure periods. However, their compatibility may be limited in extended contact with acetone or under specific conditions. It's important to note that the compatibility of gasket materials with acetone can vary based on factors such as temperature, concentration, and exposure duration. Before selecting gaskets for use with acetone, it's advisable to also consider the temperature and pressure range of your application to ensure that the chosen material is suitable for your specific application. Additionally, when working with acetone or any other chemical, it's crucial to follow proper safety protocols, including wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), working in a well-ventilated area, and observing all relevant safety guidelines. How do I clean with Acetone? Cleaning with acetone involves a few simple steps, but it's important to exercise caution due to its flammable nature and strong odor. Here's how to clean with acetone safely and effectively: Materials Needed: Acetone Clean, lint-free cloth or paper towels Ventilated area or protective mask Gloves Eye protection Steps: Choose a Well-Ventilated Area: Before you begin, make sure you're in a well-ventilated space. Acetone has strong fumes, so working outdoors or in a well-ventilated room is recommended. If ventilation is limited, consider wearing a protective mask and eye protection. Put on Protective Gear: While not always necessary for small cleaning tasks, wearing gloves and eye protection can help prevent skin and eye irritation. Test in an Inconspicuous Area: Before using acetone on a larger surface, test it in a small, inconspicuous area to ensure it doesn't damage or discolor the material you're cleaning. Apply Acetone: Moisten a clean, lint-free cloth or paper towel with a small amount of acetone. Gently blot or rub the area you want to clean. Start with a light touch and gradually increase pressure if needed. Avoid scrubbing vigorously, as this could damage surfaces or spread stains. Wipe Clean: As you blot or rub, you'll notice that dirt, residue, or certain stains are lifted onto the cloth. Continue until the area looks clean. For stubborn stains, you may need to repeat the process or use a slightly more concentrated amount of acetone. Dry the Area: After cleaning, use a separate clean cloth or paper towel to dry the area thoroughly. This helps prevent any remaining acetone from evaporating and leaving streaks. Dispose of Materials Safely: Dispose of used cloths, paper towels, and other materials soaked in acetone responsibly. Place them in a sealed container or bag and dispose of them according to your local regulations for hazardous waste. Wash Hands: After you're finished, wash your hands with soap and water to remove any traces of acetone. Important Tips: Acetone can damage certain plastics, paints, and finishes, so always test it in an inconspicuous area first. Do not use acetone on leather, acetate fabrics, or materials with printed designs, as it can cause fading or damage. Keep acetone away from open flames, sparks, or heat sources, as it is highly flammable. Always work in a well-ventilated area or use appropriate personal protective equipment. Remember that acetone is a powerful solvent, so it's best suited for specific cleaning tasks like removing certain adhesives, paint splatters, or sticky residues. If you're uncertain about using acetone on a particular material or surface, consider seeking professional advice or trying an alternative cleaning method. How Do I Make My Own Acetone-Based Nail Polish Remover? Cleaning with acetone involves a few simple steps, but it's important to exercise caution due to its flammable nature and strong odor. Here's how to clean with acetone safely and effectively: Materials Needed: Acetone Clean, lint-free cloth or paper towels Ventilated area or protective mask Gloves (optional) Eye protection (optional) Steps: Choose a Well-Ventilated Area: Before you begin, make sure you're in a well-ventilated space. Acetone has strong fumes, so working outdoors or in a well-ventilated room is recommended. If ventilation is limited, consider wearing a protective mask and eye protection. Put on Protective Gear: While not always necessary for small cleaning tasks, wearing gloves and eye protection can help prevent skin and eye irritation. Test in an Inconspicuous Area: Before using acetone on a larger surface, test it in a small, inconspicuous area to ensure it doesn't damage or discolor the material you're cleaning. Apply Acetone: Moisten a clean, lint-free cloth or paper towel with a small amount of acetone. Gently blot or rub the area you want to clean. Start with a light touch and gradually increase pressure if needed. Avoid scrubbing vigorously, as this could damage surfaces or spread stains. Wipe Clean: As you blot or rub, you'll notice that dirt, residue, or certain stains are lifted onto the cloth. Continue until the area looks clean. For stubborn stains, you may need to repeat the process or use a slightly more concentrated amount of acetone. Dry the Area: After cleaning, use a separate clean cloth or paper towel to dry the area thoroughly. This helps prevent any remaining acetone from evaporating and leaving streaks. Dispose of Materials Safely: Dispose of used cloths, paper towels, and other materials soaked in acetone responsibly. Place them in a sealed container or bag and dispose of them according to your local regulations for hazardous waste. Wash Hands: After you're finished, wash your hands with soap and water to remove any traces of acetone. Important Tips: Acetone can damage certain plastics, paints, and finishes, so always test it in an inconspicuous area first. Do not use acetone on leather, acetate fabrics, or materials with printed designs, as it can cause fading or damage. Keep acetone away from open flames, sparks, or heat sources, as it is highly flammable. Always work in a well-ventilated area or use appropriate personal protective equipment. Remember that acetone is a powerful solvent, so it's best suited for specific cleaning tasks like removing certain adhesives, paint splatters, or sticky residues. If you're uncertain about using acetone on a particular material or surface, consider seeking professional advice or trying an alternative cleaning method. What Is The Average Amount Of Acetone Used in Nail Polish Remover? The average amount of acetone used in commercial nail polish remover products typically ranges from 30% to 50%. This means that the nail polish remover solution contains 30% to 50% acetone, along with other ingredients such as water, emollients, and fragrances. The exact percentage can vary depending on the brand and formulation of the nail polish remover. When making your own nail polish remover at home, you can use pure acetone or a solution with a similar acetone concentration. Keep in mind that using pure acetone can be harsh on your nails and cuticles, potentially causing dryness and irritation with frequent use. It's a good idea to experiment with different acetone concentrations and observe how your nails and skin react to find the right balance between effective nail polish removal and gentle care for your nails. How Do you Dispose of Acetone? Disposing of acetone properly is important to ensure environmental and personal safety. Here are the steps to follow for proper acetone disposal: Check Local Regulations: Before disposing of acetone, check your local regulations and guidelines for hazardous waste disposal. Different regions may have specific requirements and disposal methods. Use a Secure Container: Transfer the acetone to a tightly sealed, labeled, and non-reactive container. Glass or metal containers with a secure lid are recommended. Label the Container: Clearly label the container with the contents ("Acetone"), the hazard symbol, and any other relevant information. Do Not Mix: Do not mix acetone with other chemicals, as this could lead to hazardous reactions. Contact Local Waste Disposal Facility: Contact your local hazardous waste disposal facility or municipality to inquire about drop-off locations and collection programs for hazardous materials. Do Not Pour Down the Drain: Do not pour acetone down the drain, toilet, or any other water source, as it can contaminate water systems and harm the environment. Evaporate in a Controlled Setting: If allowed by local regulations, you can let a small amount of acetone evaporate in a well-ventilated outdoor area. Ensure it's away from open flames, sparks, or ignition sources. Recycle or Reuse: Some regions may offer recycling or reclamation programs for acetone or other solvents. Research if any such programs are available in your area. Professional Disposal: If you have a large amount of acetone or are uncertain about the proper disposal method, consider contacting a professional hazardous waste disposal service. Remember, improper disposal of hazardous materials like acetone can harm the environment, human health, and local communities. Always prioritize safety and follow the regulations set by your local authorities for proper disposal.

    $18.00 - $705.00

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